Scottish poets of the Delitiae
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Scottish poets of the Delitiae a key to the authorsof the Delitiae poetarum Scotorum, Amsterdam, 1637

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Published by Officina in Livingston .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Poets, Scottish -- Indexes.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Text on lining papers.

Other titlesDelitiae poetarum Scotorum.
Statementcompiled by W.T. Johnston.
ContributionsJohnston, W. T.
The Physical Object
Pagination11 p. ;
Number of Pages11
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15210625M
ISBN 101873661371

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Scottish literature is literature written in Scotland or by Scottish includes works in English, Scottish Gaelic, Scots, Brythonic, French, Latin, Norn or other languages written within the modern boundaries of Scotland.. The earliest extant literature written in what is now Scotland, was composed in Brythonic speech in the sixth century and has survived as part of Welsh . These begin with the earliest Scottish miscellany, John Scot's Delitiae Poetarum Scotorum (). Eighteenth-century anthologies include James Watson's Choice Collection of Comic and Serious Scots Poems (, , , 2nd edition of the first part, ), and the rare Edinburgh Miscellany ().   George Buchanan (): Buchanan is recognised as perhaps the pre-eminent Scottish neo-Latinist of his generation and was one of the most admired poets in the whole of Europe. Having studied under Mair at St. Andrews, Buchanan travelled to the University of Paris, where he studied and later taught. One of his most celebrated works of poetry was a . National Internationalism: Scottish Literature and the European Audience in the Seventeenth Century The following volumes are on all our bookshelves: The Oxford Book of English Verse, The Penguin Book of Italian Verse, The Faber Book of Mod­ ern Verse, The Nonon Anthology of English Literature, Delitiae Poetarum.

However, I think that the most overlooked Scottish authors are a bunch of Renaissance blokes: the poets of the first ever anthology of Scottish poetry in book format, the Delitiae Poetarum Scotorum, published in Amsterdam in Many of its poets have never been translated into English, and several are fascinating.   Scottish literature is literature written in Scotland or by Scottish writers. It includes works in English, Scottish Gaelic, Scots, Brythonic, French, Latin, Norn or other languages written within the modern boundaries of Scotland. Scottish literature - WikiMili, The Free Encyclopedia - . Digital Resources for Scottish Neo-Latin Literature Ralph McLean National Library of Scotland Follow this and additional works at: as Scottish poets were more receptive to continental trends, particularly the one of the editors of the recently published Delitiae Poetarum Scotorum ().Author: Ralph McLean.   ARBUTHNOT, Alexander, an eminent divine of the reign of James VI., son of the laird of Arbuthnot, was born in the year Having studied languages and philosophy in the University of Aberdeen, and civil law under the famous Cujacius at Bourges in France, he took ecclesiastical orders, and became in his own country a zealous supporter of the Reformation.

Funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and based in Glasgow's School of Humanities, the project's main output is an electronic edition of a selection of poets from the Delitiae Poetarum Scotorum (), Scotland's largest anthology of neo-Latin poetry. Dr. Arthur Johnston (?) was a Scottish poet, who wrote in Latin, and a physician. Johnston was born near Aberdeen, and studied medicine at Padua, where he graduated. After living for about 20 years in France, he returned to England, became physician to Charles I, and was afterwards Rector of King's College, Aberdeen. He attained a European reputation as a . Andrew Melville honoured his memory by an elegant epitaph in Latin, which will be found in Irving’s Life of Arbuthnot (Lives of Scots Poets, vol. ii. p. ), quoted from the Delitiae Poetarum Scotorum, (tom. ii. p. ). James Melville, in his Diary, has pronounced Arbuthnot one of the most learned men of whom Europe could at that time boast. Full text of "The Golden Treasury Of Scottish Poetry" See other formats.